Protected: Rest dignified on sacred ground my brother and together we will find the path to the blessing of reconciliation

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Finished my first two public speaking engagements

Yesterday, I completed the second of two public speaking engagements. One in Birmingham and the other in London at Fertility Fest

http://www.fertilityfest.com

A festival looking at assisted reproduction and creative responses to the experience. I was showing my work “Photos I’ll never take” and  speaking alongside Katie Barlow and Jodie Day, at the dour sounding session- Facing involuntary childlessness. I couldn’t imagine anyone coming into our session, when its such a depressing subject. Amazingly we had a full room both times. I was very impressed with Katie Barlow’s film and Jodie Day’s talk. It was great to share the session with them.
It was such a pleasure to take part in this event. Also very interesting to see how different, the same two events could be. In Birmingham, I was surprised to find that after I had shown my work in a slideshow, I couldn’t speak immediately afterwards, because all I could hear was crying from the audience.  In London, instead of crying, I got applause and lots of people came to talk to me afterwards. Same show, different response. Very interesting.
I was much more nervous for the London talk and also feeling quite emotional. Although I don’t know why. So, I took advantage of the Quiet room, to calm down beforehand. A space with trained counsellors, away from the emotions the day was bringing up. I told the counsellor that I couldn’t imagine anyone choosing our session. She told me that it had been her first choice and that two of the counsellors were coming to it. They had had to ask permission to go, as it might be too many counsellors away from the quiet room. This was great to hear.
It was also lovely to get such great feedback from the two events. However, there is something very difficult about concentrating on one’s failures. It was the first time that I had discussed my personal situation with strangers. Normally I refuse to discuss my situation and concentrate only on the art and art issues, but this event was about sharing. It was quite hard, very difficult not to think I had shared too much. Hard not to imagine being judged.
Also, there is some difficulty for me in showing my work to others in a similar situation. On one hand it was very supportive, but the work is intended for those who don’t know what its like. It’s meant to ask for empathy, but when the viewer already has the experience, is it damaging? Or is it healthy? I also have four of the photos on a wall in the theatre and I heard one person say, as she went past,  “I can’t look at those”.  I suppose it depends on what stage in the assisted reproduction process a person is. To face childlessness, when still trying, is probably not a great idea. It was also hard for me to be at a festival where some people have been successful. However, one thing we all have in common is that we have all had to at least face the prospect. of being childless.
It was great to attend other sessions, there was some great work at the Festival. Jessica Hepburn worked very hard to bring the festival about. Great idea and very well done. I’m hoping some of the contacts and offers made will come to fruition.

Details of Private View and exhibition with Uncertain States

uncertain states

UNCERTAIN STATES 2014
14 November – 5 December 2014
Private View: Thursday 13 November 6:30 – 9:00 pm

Uncertain States is pleased to announce the Fifth Annual Exhibition UCS 2014 at The Bank Gallery.

The exhibition is a selection of photographers that have contributed to the quarterly Uncertain States broadsheets over the years. This years artists include Adrian Hardy, Agatha a. Nitecka, Ania Dabrowska, Cat Stevens, Charlie Fjatstrom, Christina Reid, David George, Fiona Yaron-Field, Franscico Gomez de Villaboa, Heather McDonough, James Russell Cant, Josephine Coy, Karl Ohiri, Martina Geccelli, Mick Williamson, Mish Amikoff, Radoslav Daskalov, Richard Ansett, Rebecca Sainsot Reynolds, Richard Sawdon-Smith, Robin Grierson, Roy Mehta, Spencer Rowell, Susan Andrews and Tracey Holland.

The Bank Gallery, Central House
59-63 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7PF

Opening Times:
Tue- Fri: 11 am – 7 pm, Sat & Sun: 12 pm – 5: 30 pm.

“The death of hope” Photos about loss- an extension to my project “Photos I’ll never take”.

It’s of a carousel wrapped up and out of use. Barry, my husband has taken some photos of this too, as we discovered it together, but as it isn’t his normal type of subject, I’m going to run with it.

I think its fits in neatly with the loss of hope in having children.  Its a children’s playground item, and out of use, in the centre of a big city.

I started off taking straightforward shots of the carousel, then started to walk round it taking panoramas. This led to walking round taking a movie, as it made it look like it was moving. This was quite hard to do and took a long time, as the light made it difficult to see what I was filming and I didn’t want the foreground in the picture. I had to do it several times and was surprised to find that walking slowly produced the best results. I had originally thought that walking fast would be best as it would mimic the actual carousel moving. However by going slower it gave time to take in details. I love the sound effects too, the bird chirping in the movie is the best! This post includes the movie and I’ll post the photos over the next few days.